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Adolescent Medicine 

Adolescent Medicine - Tailored to Teen's Needs
Adolescent Medicine doctors are trained to address the very specific physical, emotional and developmental needs of individuals ages 12 to 26. Division Chief Allison Eliscu, MD, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at Stony Brook University School of Medicine, talks about what the department offers, how it benefits teens and parents, and the role she and her colleagues play in keeping Suffolk County's adolescents safe and healthy. 

Autism Spectrum Disorder

What You Need to Know About Autism Spectrum Disorder
Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder now believed to have a number of causes that manifest in slightly different ways. This range of disorders is known as the autism spectrum. Our two autism experts, Dr. Zoya Popivker, a child and adolescent psychiatrist, and Dr. Jennifer Keluskar, a child and adolescent psychologist, explain.

Baby Safety

Alone, Back, Crib: How to Keep Babies Safe While They Sleep
September is Baby Safety Month — a time to spread awareness about the importance of keeping your baby safe at all times. Safe-to-sleep practices have been shown to significantly reduce deaths. Dr. Susan Katz, Coordinator of the Pediatric Injury Prevention Program, and Marianna Lawrence, Coordinator of the Regional Perinatal Center, discuss the key steps to keeping infants safe while they sleep.

Brain Injury

What You Need to Know About Preventing Brain Injury in Children
Michael Egnor, MD, shares steps that parents can take to help prevent brain injury in their children.

What You Need to Know About Brain Injury in Children and Adults
An estimated 2.5 million people in the U.S. sustain a traumatic brain injury each year. And about 5.3 million Americans live with a TBI-related disability. As pediatric neurosurgeon David A. Chesler, MD, PhD, and neurorehabilitation neurologist Andrew Goldfine, MD, explain, proper diagnosis and treatment are key. 

Brain Tumors

What Parents Should Know About Brain Tumors in Children
After leukemia, brain tumors represent the most common type of cancers in children. In 2013, there were over 4,000 newly diagnosed pediatric brain tumors in the United States; over 3,000 occurred in children under the age of 15. Dr. Chesler, a fellowship-trained expert on childhood brain tumors, is one of fewer than 200 actively practicing pediatric neurosurgeons in the United States.

Car Safety - Child and Teen

What Parents Need to Know about Child and Teen Car Safety
The facts couldn’t be clearer: Car accidents are the number-one cause of accidental deaths in children ages 0-19 nationally. And in New York State, Suffolk County has the highest teen death rate from auto accidents. Motor vehicle accidents are also responsible for an alarming proportion of disabling injuries. The experts at Stony Brook Children’s want you to not only be aware of this problem, but also to take action to keep your children and teens safe.

Cancer

After Cancer: What Can Children Expect?
Thanks to major medical advances in the past decade, 90 percent of kids who had cancer during childhood survive. And with this encouraging news comes a question that most parents never considered during those intense weeks and months of treatment: What are the long-term effects of the disease and/or the therapies? Dr. Laura Hogan, an expert on pediatric cancer survivorship, talks about what they are and how to address them.

Cardiac Imaging for Children

What You Need to Know About Specialized Cardiac Imaging for Children
Most children’s hearts are healthy. But if there is a suspected problem, because pediatric heart problems are indeed so rare, it is vital to quickly and thoroughly investigate them. Dr. James Nielsen explains what parents need to know.

Child Life Services

Child Life Services Brings Comfort to Hospitalized Kids
Child Life Services at Stony Brook Children’s Hospital helps children and their families feel comfortable during hospital and outpatient visits. Here’s what Child Life Services Director Joan Alpers wants parents and families to know about Child Life Specialists’ critical role at children’s hospitals.

Children's Emergency Care

Common Questions About Pediatric Emergency Care
Parents need to know what type of emergency care is available for their children if they become acutely ill or injured. Carl Kaplan, MD, Director of the Pediatric Emergency Department at Stony Brook Children’s Hospital, provides some important information about pediatric emergency care.

Children's Obesity

When Children Are Overweight: Real and Lasting Solutions
March is National Nutrition Month. Because COVID has caused many children to limit their activities this winter, overweight and obesity in children has become a greater concern. Our physicians from Stony Brook Children’s Healthy Weight and Wellness Center, pediatrician Denise C. Woodall-Ruff, MD, FAAP, and pediatric cardiologist Peter Morelli, MD, share their best advice for helping children and teens deal with obesity and the subsequent health problems it can cause.

Children's Weight & Wellness

When Children Are Overweight: Real and Lasting Solutions
March is National Nutrition Month. Because COVID has caused many children to limit their activities this winter, overweight and obesity in children has become a greater concern. Our physicians from Stony Brook Children’s Healthy Weight and Wellness Center, pediatrician Denise C. Woodall-Ruff, MD, FAAP, and pediatric cardiologist Peter Morelli, MD, share their best advice for helping children and teens deal with obesity and the subsequent health problems it can cause.

Cleft Palate

Something to Smile About - A Premier Cleft Palate Team
You probably know someone born with a cleft lip or palate - it's among the most common types of birth defects. But did you know that one of the nation's premier cleft palate teams is as close as Stony Brook Children's Hospital? Here, plastic surgeon Dr. Alexander Dagum and orthodontist Dr. Leon Klempner talk about what kids with clefts need over the course of their childhood - and how Stony Brook helps them.

Coronavirus

Multisystem Inflammatory Illness (MIS-C): Kids and COVID-19 Complications
As we discover more about the effects of coronavirus, we’re also learning about a new and rare illness in children that appears to be connected to COVID-19. Dr. Christy Beneri explains what parents should look for and what steps to take if their child develops any of the signs or symptoms.

Well Visits, Vaccines and Coronavirus - Get Your Questions Answered
Vaccines and well visits are critical to a child’s healthy development. Here, Dr. Jill Creighton talks about well visits during the coronavirus pandemic and the many precautions being taken to keep your child protected.
 

Craniosynostosis

Should I be concerned about my baby's head?
Craniosynostosis is a condition that affects the head/skull and face. It occurs in one out of 2,500 births. Few pediatric neurosurgeons in our region have the advanced training required to diagnose and treat this condition. David A. Chesler, MD, PhD, a Johns Hopkins fellowship-trained, board-certified pediatric neurosurgeon at Stony Brook Children’s Hospital is an expert in treating craniosynostosis.

Dental Health

Giving Children on Long Island Increased Access to State-of-the-Art Dental Care
Dr. Maria Ryan discusses why dental health is key to overall good health, what a children’s hospital can offer, and how Stony Brook Children’s has made access to dental care a priority for the children of Long Island. 

Diabetes 

What You Need to Know About Diabetes in Children

Diabetes is not just an adult disease. Diabetes can affect people of all ages, including infants and children. There are two primary forms: Type 1, which is an autoimmune disease, and Type 2, which is associated with increased body weight. Pediatric endocrinologists, Thomas A. Wilson, MD, Professor of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, and Jennifer Osipoff, MD, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, discuss diabetes in children and the treatments available at Stony Brook Children's Service.

Epilepsy

What You Should Know About Epilepsy and Seizures
Epilepsy and seizures affect more than three million Americans, with about 200,000 new cases diagnosed each year. Rebecca Spiegel, MD, a neurologist and Director, along with David A. Chesler, MD, PhD, a neurological surgeon, both at the Stony Brook Epilepsy Center, explain how when properly diagnosed and treated, most people with epilepsy can expect to get their seizures under control.

Flu

10 Truths about the Flu

Flu season will be here very soon and, like the coronavirus, it’s a respiratory illness. With experts predicting that there may be a surge of coronavirus cases in the fall and winter, and since it is not known if getting COVID-19 along with the flu will result in a more severe illness, it’s even more important to ensure everyone aged six months or older who can receive a flu vaccine gets one. According to Sharon Nachman, MD, Director, Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases at Stony Brook Children’s Hospital, knowledge is one of the keys to illness prevention. Here’s her list of the top 10 flu truths she wants you to know.

What You Need to Know About the Flu: Your Top Questions Answered
Concerned about flu season? Wondering if you and your children should get vaccinated? Saul Hymes, MD, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics and a specialist in pediatric infectious diseases with Stony Brook Children's Hospital, addresses the most common concerns about flu season and, more importantly, what you can do now to protect yourself and your children.

Food Allergies

Questions about Food Allergies in Children
Today, more and more infants and children are being diagnosed with asthma, eczema, hay fever and food allergies. Food allergies are of particular concern, because reactions may be severe and even fatal. Currently, one in 13 children has a food allergy. Here, Dr. Susan Schuval talks about the rising incidence of food allergies in children, and what parents need to know. 

Handwashing

What You Need to Know About Handwashing
Francina Singh, RN, BScN, MPH, CIC, a registered nurse with a master's degree in public health and a certification in Infection Control, and Director of Healthcare Epidemiology, talks about why handwashing is so important, especially in a hospital environment.

Heart Condition

A Heartfelt Talk About Pediatric Cardiology
It can be frightening and confusing for parents to hear their child may have a heart problem. Fortunately, Long Island is home to one of New York’s most renowned academic medical centers and the only children’s hospital in Suffolk County. Pediatric cardiologists at Stony Brook Children’s Hospital answer your questions about childhood heart disease.

When Your Child Has a Heart Condition... Here's What Matters
When your child has a heart condition, expertise and state-of-the-art care count, but so do other factors, like compassion, communication and accessibility. Pediatric Cardiologist Laurie E. Panesar, MD, and Nurse Practitioner Marybeth Heyden, who holds a doctorate in nursing, talk about Stony Brook's unique approach.

Imaging

Unique Imaging Technology for Children with Scoliosis and Spinal Deformities
Reducing radiation exposure is particularly beneficial for patients requiring frequent imaging, such as children with limb length or angular deformities, like knock knees, or spine deformities, like scoliosis. Dr. Carrion shares his expertise on EOS® imaging and the benefits of low-dose radiation for children living with these conditions.

Multisystem Inflammatory Illness (MIS-C)

Kids and COVID-19 Complications - Our Expert Addresses Your Concerns
As we discover more about the effects of coronavirus, we’re also learning about a new and rare illness in children that appears to be connected to COVID-19. Dr. Christy Beneri explains what parents should look for and what steps to take if their child develops any of the signs or symptoms.

Neuropsychology

What Every Parent Should Know About Our Neuropsychology Services
Neuropsychology is an area of psychology that focuses on the relationships between the human brain, behavior and mind. Often, in the aftermath of a life-altering illness or brain injury, a referral to a neuropsychologist is critical in helping a child or adolescent improve their emotional wellbeing and helping to ensure that the right accommodations are in place for school, extracurricular activities, work and home. 

Pediatric Arthritis

What Parents Should Know About Arthritis and Children
Although most people associate arthritis with aging, the fact is, one in 1,000 children is diagnosed with juvenile arthritis. As part of Juvenile Arthritis Awareness Month, Pediatric Rheumatologist Dr. Julie Cherian addresses the most common questions from parents – and discusses what they can do if they suspect their child may have arthritis.

Pediatric Cystic Fibrosis

Updates on Pediatric Pulmonology and Cystic Fibrosis
What's could be more important than every breath your child takes? Stony Brook Children’s Hospital’s pediatric pulmonology services help Suffolk County children with everything from asthma and chronic lung diseases to cystic fibrosis and sleep disorders. Here, Division Chief Catherine Kier, MD, talks about new ways Stony Brook Children’s is helping the children of Suffolk County (and their parents) breathe easier.

Pediatric Emergency Care

Common Questions About Pediatric Emergency Care
Parents need to know what type of emergency care is available for their children if they become acutely ill or injured. Carl Kaplan, MD, Director of the Pediatric Emergency Department at Stony Brook Children’s Hospital, provides some important information about pediatric emergency care.

Pediatric Hypertension

Pediatric Hypertension: A Growing Problem with Long-Term Health Risks
People rarely think that children can have high blood pressure. But the reality is that hypertension is becoming a growing problem among children and teens. Dr. Robert Woroniecki, Division Chief of Pediatric Nephrology and Hypertension, and Dr. Katarina Supe-Markovina, Director of the new Pediatric Hypertension Center at Stony Brook Children's Hospital, discuss what every parent needs to know.

Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU)

Get to Know Stony Brook Children's Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU)
Critical care medicine is a special discipline that brings together healthcare professionals to help seriously ill patients. Stony Brook Children’s pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) has a highly skilled healthcare team led by Margaret Parker, MD, who was recently named a Master of Critical Care Medicine by the Society of Critical Care Medicine. 

Pediatric Nephrology

Kids and Kidneys: What Parents Should Know
What should you know about your child's kidneys and when should you seek help? The pediatric nephrologists (children's kidney specialists) at Stony Brook Children's Hospital offer comprehensive services for kidney problems of all kinds - with an emphasis on accurate and early identification of potential issues. Dr. Robert Woroniecki, Division Chief of Pediatric Nephrology and Hypertension, and Dr. Katarina Supe-Markovina, Director of the new Pediatric Hypertension Center at Stony Brook Children's Hospital, discuss what every parent needs to know. 

Pediatric Obesity

When Children Are Overweight: Real and Lasting Solutions
March is National Nutrition Month. Because COVID has caused many children to limit their activities this winter, overweight and obesity in children has become a greater concern. Our physicians from Stony Brook Children’s Healthy Weight and Wellness Center, pediatrician Denise C. Woodall-Ruff, MD, FAAP, and pediatric cardiologist Peter Morelli, MD, share their best advice for helping children and teens deal with obesity and the subsequent health problems it can cause.

Pediatric Pulmonology and Cystic Fibrosis

Pediatric Pulmonology and Cystic Fibrosis
What could be more important than every breath your child takes? Stony Brook Children’s Hospital’s pediatric pulmonology services help Suffolk County children with everything from asthma and chronic lung diseases to cystic fibrosis and sleep disorders. Here, Division Chief Catherine Kier, MD, talks about new ways Stony Brook Children’s is helping the children of Suffolk County (and their parents) breathe easier.

Pediatric Weight & Wellness

When Children Are Overweight: Real and Lasting Solutions
March is National Nutrition Month. Because COVID has caused many children to limit their activities this winter, overweight and obesity in children has become a greater concern. Our physicians from Stony Brook Children’s Healthy Weight and Wellness Center, pediatrician Denise C. Woodall-Ruff, MD, FAAP, and pediatric cardiologist Peter Morelli, MD, share their best advice for helping children and teens deal with obesity and the subsequent health problems it can cause.

Premature Birth

What You Should Know About Premature Birth
Drs. Shanthy Sridhar and James Bernasko discuss why every week of development before birth is important — and Stony Brook’s services for high-risk moms and premature babies.

Skin Cancer Prevention: Sun Safety

Summer Sun Safety: What You Absolutely Need to Know Now
Maribeth Chitkara, MD, a pediatric hospitalist with Stony Brook Children's Hospital, discusses summer safety and skin cancer prevention steps you can take today to keep yourself, your family and your children safe all summer long. 

Sleep Disorders in Children 

Does Your Child Have a Sleep Disorder?
According to the National Sleep Foundation, about 69 percent of children age 10 and under experience some type of sleep problem, and of these, about half might need medical attention. Catherine Kier, MD, a pediatric pulmonologist and pediatric sleep specialist, discusses sleep disorders in infants and children, and what measures you can take to promote better sleep.

Surgery

When Kids Need Surgery
Pediatric surgery is a unique medical specialty, provided by highly skilled general surgeons further trained in the intricacies of treating smaller patients, including those not yet born. Christopher S. Muratore, MD, Chief of the Division of Pediatric Surgery, discusses the reasons why parents should seek out a pediatric surgeon should their child require a surgical procedure.

Trauma

If Trauma Happens: What Should You Do and Where Should You Go
Traumas come in many forms: automobile accidents, burns, falls, serious injury and other unplanned events. What they all have in common, however, is that they need immediate, expert treatment. How do you know where to go? Trauma surgeon Dr. James Vosswinkel shares his perspective on how to make such a critical decision.

Vaccinations

Well Visits, Vaccines and Coronavirus - Get Your Questions Answered
Vaccines and well visits are critical to a child’s healthy development. Here, Dr. Jill Creighton talks about well visits during the coronavirus pandemic and the many precautions being taken to keep your child protected.
 

Vehicular Safety - Child and Teen

What Parents Need to Know About Child and Teen Car Safety
The facts couldn’t be clearer: Car accidents are the number-one cause of accidental deaths in children ages 0-19 nationally. And in New York State, Suffolk County has the highest teen death rate from auto accidents. Motor vehicle accidents are also responsible for an alarming proportion of disabling injuries. The experts at Stony Brook Children’s want you to not only be aware of this problem, but also to take action to keep your children and teens safe.

Water Safety

Summer Water Safety: What You Absolutely Need to Know
With Long Island's miles of beaches and acres of pools, Maribeth Chitkara, MD, a pediatric hospitalist with Stony Brook Long Island Children's Hospital, gives tips on water safety. Dr. Chitkara is one of Long Island's most committed advocates for summer safety, and shares steps you can take to keep yourself, your family and your children safe all summer long.

Summer Safety: How to Prevent Pool Drownings 
Right now families are spending even more time together at home. With summer here, that can mean lots of pool time and, sadly, preventable drownings. Kristi Ladowski, our injury prevention specialist, offers sound advice that can help keep your family safe.

  

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