Pediatric Radiology

Stony Brook Medicine

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    Overview The Division of Radiology of Stony Brook Children's provides diagnostic imaging and interventional procedures for neonates, infants, children, adolescents, and pregnant women. Our radiologists, technologists, nursing team, and support staff are committed to safety first and making your visit to our hospital and department efficient and pleasurable. Imaging and image-guided therapies are performed using state-of-the art technologies and protocols. This includes use of a 320-multislice CT scanner to deliver the lowest possible radiation exposure and a 3T MRI scanner to achieve the highest possible image quality with no radiation. Our academic- and research-based approach, combined with use of the latest technologies, makes Stony Brook Children’s the most advanced pediatric radiology program in the region.

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    CONTACT US Division of Pediatric Radiology (631) 444-2471
    For an appointment: (631) 444-KIDS

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    Services Diagnostic Radiology Diagnostic radiology uses medical imaging technology to see into the body without surgery, pinpointing and identifying disorders. Modalities include radiography (“x-rays”), fluoroscopy (“fluoro”), ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and nuclear medicine. Interventional Radiology Interventional radiology is a specialized service using image guidance to perform minimally invasive procedures, both for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Procedures include vascular access, enteric access, biopsies, drainages, catheter angiography, angioplasty, nephrostograms with nephrostomy drainage, and transhepatic cholangiograms with biliary drainage.

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    Patient Resources ACR http://www.acr.org RSNA http://www.rsna.org Image Gently http://www.imagegently.org SPR Society for Pediatric Radiology http://www.pedrad.org/

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    Research and Education As part of the academic mission of Stony Brook University Medical Center, we collaborate closely with all of the pediatric departments at Stony Brook Children’s in the teaching of tomorrow's professionals and creating a pipeline of specialty physicians for the community. Our pediatric imaging team is committed to searching for new and better ways of diagnosing disease. One of our primary research interests, lead by Dr. Hellinger, is the technique and application of low-dose and ultra low-dose CT imaging for pediatric patients.

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    Advances and Recognitions Our pediatric radiology faculty is recognized nationally and internationally, serving and contributing to pediatric societies and conferences for the advancement of pediatric imaging. Their work has received distinguished recognition at meetings and has been the focus for local news stories in Suffolk County.

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    Definitions Computed Tomography: Computed tomography is a non-invasive imaging technology that uses x-rays and computers to create an image of the inside of the body. Most body parts can be examined using CT.

    Contrast: Many radiology procedures require a contrast agent be introduced into the body to help see the body's internal organs more clearly. Iodine agents are used for CT and catheter angiography, Gadolinium for MRI, and barium for gastrointestinal procedures.

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): This diagnostic imaging procedure uses radiofrequencies to produce images of the body in both two and three dimension. No radiation is required with MRI

    Nuclear Medicine: This imaging modality uses small amounts of radioisotopes (radiopharmaceuticals) to image anatomical function of organs. The radioisotopes are attracted to specific organs— and emit. gamma rays that can be detected externally by special types of cameras. These cameras then work in conjunction with computers to form functional images

    Radiography: General radiography is the most basic form of medical imaging. It uses x-rays to create a fixed or still image of the body. Any part of the body can be examined with radiography.

    Ultrasound: This is a non-invasive imaging technique that uses sound waves to produce images of the organs and soft tissues inside the body.

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